Financial Reporting FR

SIC-20 Equity Accounting Method – Recognition of Losses

SIC-20 Equity Accounting Method – Recognition of Losses
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SIC-20, or the “Equity Accounting Method – Recognition of Losses” is a standard issued by the International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee (IFRIC) that provides guidance on how to recognize losses related to equity-accounted investments in the financial statements of an entity.

 

Definition:

SIC-20 defines equity-accounted investments as investments in which an entity has significant influence but not control over the financial and operating policies of an investee. Significant influence is the power to participate in the financial and operating policy decisions of the investee but is not control or joint control over those policies.

 

Explanations:

SIC-20 provides guidance on how to recognize losses related to equity-accounted investments. It states that an entity should recognize its share of the losses of an equity-accounted investee in its financial statements when the losses exceed the carrying amount of the investment. In other words, the entity should recognize its share of the losses up to the amount of its investment, and any losses beyond that should not be recognized.

 

Examples:

Let’s consider an example to understand the application of SIC-20. Company A holds a 30% equity investment in Company B and has significant influence over its financial and operating policies. Company B incurs a loss of $1 million during the reporting period. Company A’s carrying amount of the investment in Company B is $10 million. According to SIC-20, Company A should recognize its share of the loss of Company B in its financial statements, up to the carrying amount of its investment. In this case, Company A’s share of the loss would be $300,000 (30% of $1 million), which is the amount recognized in Company A’s financial statements.

 

Case Studies:

XYZ Corporation, a global conglomerate, holds a 25% equity investment in ABC Limited, a manufacturing company. XYZ Corporation has significant influence over ABC Limited and accounts for its investment using the equity accounting method. During the reporting period, ABC Limited incurs a loss of $5 million. XYZ Corporation’s carrying amount of the investment in ABC Limited is $30 million. According to SIC-20, XYZ Corporation should recognize its share of the loss of ABC Limited in its financial statements, up to the carrying amount of its investment. In this case, XYZ Corporation’s share of the loss would be $1.25 million (25% of $5 million), which is the amount recognized in XYZ Corporation’s financial statements.

Company P holds a 40% equity investment in Company Q, a technology company. Company P has significant influence over Company Q and accounts for its investment using the equity accounting method. During the reporting period, Company Q incurs a loss of $3 million. Company P’s carrying amount of the investment in Company Q is $8 million. According to SIC-20, Company P should recognize its share of the loss of Company Q in its financial statements, up to the carrying amount of its investment. In this case, Company P’s share of the loss would be $1.2 million (40% of $3 million), which is the amount recognized in Company P’s financial statements.

 

In conclusion, SIC-20 provides guidance on how to recognize losses related to equity-accounted investments in the financial statements of an entity. It emphasizes that an entity should recognize its share of the losses of an equity-accounted investee up to the carrying amount of the investment. The examples and case studies presented illustrate the application of SIC-20 in recognizing losses related to equity-accounted investments in different scenarios. It is important for entities to carefully apply the provisions of SIC-20 when recognizing losses from equity-accounted investments in their financial statements, ensuring compliance with the relevant accounting standards and regulations.

It is worth noting that SIC-20 also provides guidance on how to account for any additional losses beyond the carrying amount of the investment. According to the standard, if an entity has an obligation or has made payments on behalf of the investee in excess of its share of the investee’s losses, the entity should recognize such excess as an expense unless it has a legal or constructive obligation to settle the excess on behalf of the investee.

Furthermore, SIC-20 also highlights that entities should carefully consider the indicators of impairment for equity-accounted investments, as the recognition of losses may also be influenced by the impairment assessment. For example, if there are indications that the investment has been impaired, the entity should recognize an impairment loss in accordance with the applicable accounting standards, and this may affect the recognition of losses under SIC-20.

It is also important to note that SIC-20 does not provide guidance on how to recognize gains from equity-accounted investments. Instead, the recognition of gains is typically governed by the applicable accounting standards, which may differ depending on the specific circumstances and the accounting treatment chosen by the entity.

 

In conclusion, SIC-20 provides guidance on how to recognize losses related to equity-accounted investments in the financial statements of an entity. It emphasizes that entities should recognize their share of the losses up to the carrying amount of the investment, and provides additional guidance on the treatment of any excess losses and impairment considerations. It is important for entities to carefully apply the provisions of SIC-20 and ensure compliance with the relevant accounting standards and regulations when recognizing losses from equity-accounted investments in their financial statements.