Financial Reporting FR

IFRIC 9 Reassessment of Embedded Derivatives

IFRIC 9 Reassessment of Embedded Derivatives
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IFRIC 9, or the International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee Interpretation 9, deals with the reassessment of embedded derivatives in financial instruments. Embedded derivatives are components of financial instruments that have characteristics of derivatives but are not separate instruments themselves. The purpose of IFRIC 9 is to provide guidance on how to assess and recognize these embedded derivatives in financial statements.

 

Definitions:

Before we delve into the details, let us first define some key terms that are relevant to IFRIC 9. A derivative is a financial instrument whose value is derived from an underlying asset or benchmark, such as a stock, bond, or commodity. It can be used to hedge or speculate on the price movements of the underlying asset. An embedded derivative, on the other hand, is a component of a financial instrument that has the characteristics of a derivative, such as a forward contract or an option, but is not a separate instrument itself.

 

Explanations:

IFRIC 9 provides guidance on when to reassess the embedded derivative in a financial instrument. A reassessment is necessary when there is a significant change in the terms and conditions of the instrument that may affect the fair value of the embedded derivative. This could include changes in interest rates, foreign exchange rates, or other market conditions that may impact the underlying asset or benchmark. If a reassessment is necessary, the embedded derivative must be separated from the host contract and accounted for separately.

For example, consider a convertible bond that allows the holder to convert the bond into shares of the issuer’s stock at a fixed conversion price. The conversion option is an embedded derivative because it has the characteristics of an option. If there is a significant change in the stock price, the fair value of the conversion option may also change. In this case, the issuer would need to reassess the embedded derivative and account for it separately if necessary.

IFRIC 9 also provides guidance on how to determine the fair value of an embedded derivative. If the fair value of the embedded derivative cannot be determined reliably on its own, it must be estimated as a part of the fair value of the host contract. This requires judgment and may involve the use of complex valuation models.

 

Examples:

To illustrate how IFRIC 9 works in practice, let us consider some examples of financial instruments that may contain embedded derivatives.

Example 1: A loan with an interest rate swap

A company enters into a loan agreement with a bank that includes an interest rate swap. The swap allows the company to exchange fixed-rate interest payments for variable-rate interest payments. The interest rate swap is an embedded derivative because it has the characteristics of a forward contract. If there is a significant change in interest rates, the fair value of the swap may also change. The company would need to reassess the embedded derivative and account for it separately if necessary.

 

Example 2: A stock option plan

A company establishes a stock option plan for its employees that allows them to purchase company stock at a fixed price. The option is an embedded derivative because it has the characteristics of an option. If there is a significant change in the stock price, the fair value of the option may also change. The company would need to reassess the embedded derivative and account for it separately if necessary.

 

Case Studies:

To further understand how IFRIC 9 works, let us look at some real-life examples of companies that had to reassess embedded derivatives.

 

Case Study 1: Porsche SE

In 2008, Porsche SE entered into a series of options contracts that gave it the right to purchase shares of Volkswagen AG at a fixed price. These options were embedded derivatives in Porsche’s financial statements. When Volkswagen’s stock price increased dramatically in 2008, the fair value of the options also increased significantly. Porsche had to reassess the embedded derivatives and recognize a large unrealized gain in its financial statements. This led to controversy and investigations by regulators.

 

Case Study 2: Royal Bank of Scotland

In 2008, the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) entered into a complex financial instrument called a collateralized debt obligation (CDO) that included embedded derivatives. When the value of the underlying assets, which were mortgage-backed securities, declined sharply, the fair value of the embedded derivatives also decreased. RBS had to reassess the embedded derivatives and recognize significant losses in its financial statements. This contributed to the bank’s financial difficulties during the global financial crisis.

 

Conclusion:

IFRIC 9 provides guidance on how to assess and recognize embedded derivatives in financial instruments. Reassessments of embedded derivatives are necessary when there are significant changes in the terms and conditions of the instrument that may affect the fair value of the embedded derivative. The fair value of an embedded derivative may need to be estimated if it cannot be determined reliably on its own. Real-life examples, such as those of Porsche SE and Royal Bank of Scotland, illustrate the importance of correctly assessing and accounting for embedded derivatives in financial statements.